High Blood Pressure

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American Heart Association

The American Heart Association provides a large collection of resources to help you learn about and mange your blood pressure. Below are a few resources that they provide. To explore their full library, visit their website by clicking the button below. 

What is high blood pressure?

High blood pressure (also referred to as HBP, or hypertension) is when your blood pressure, the force of blood flowing through your blood vessels, is consistently too high. Learn more about high blood pressure.

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Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

Healthy and unhealthy blood pressure ranges
Learn what’s considered normal, as recommended by the American Heart Association.

Note: A diagnosis of high blood pressure must be confirmed with a medical professional. A doctor should also evaluate any unusually low blood pressure readings.

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Health Threats from High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure threatens your health and quality of life
In most cases, damage done from high blood pressure (HBP or hypertension) occurs over time. Left undetected or uncontrolled, high blood pressure can lead to significant health threats. To learn more about the consequences of HBP, click on the button below:

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High blood pressure can run in families. If your parents or close blood relatives have had high blood pressure, you are more likely to develop it, too. However, lifestyle choices have allowed many people with a family history of high blood pressure to avoid it themselves.

Myth: High blood pressure runs in my family. There is nothing I can do to prevent it.

In some people, sodium can increase blood pressure. But controlling sodium means more than just putting down the salt shaker. It also means checking labels, because up to 75 percent of the sodium we consume is hidden in processed foods like tomato sauce, soups, condiments, canned foods and prepared mixes. When buying prepared and prepackaged foods, read the labels. Watch for the words “soda” and “sodium” and the symbol “Na” on labels. These words show that sodium compounds are present.

Myth: I don’t use table salt, so I’m in control of my sodium intake and my blood pressure.

Chemically, kosher salt and sea salt are the same as table salt — 40 percent sodium— and count the same toward total sodium consumption. Table salt is a combination of the two minerals sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl).

Myth: I use kosher or sea salt when I cook instead of regular table salt. They are low-sodium alternatives.

In some people, sodium can increase blood pressure. But controlling sodium means more than just putting down the salt shaker. It also means checking labels, because up to 75 percent of the sodium we consume is hidden in processed foods like tomato sauce, soups, condiments, canned foods and prepared mixes. When buying prepared and prepackaged foods, read the labels. Watch for the words “soda” and “sodium” and the symbol “Na” on labels. These words show that sodium compounds are present.

Myth: I feel fine. I don’t have to worry about high blood pressure.
Open Book

Common High Blood Pressure Myths

Knowing the facts can help you make smart choices

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